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An Alternative Approach to Sports Injuries

Dayton Kelly An Alternative Approach to Sports Injuries Virtual reality devices have flooded the gaming and entertainment markets. Advances in realism and affordability have stolen the hearts of consumers, increasing their commonality in homes. While it has certainly attracted the eye of the public, virtual reality has also struck the interest of exercise physiologists.

3 Natural Remedies for Sore Muscles

Alyssa Bialowas There’s no better feeling than the rush you get after a great workout, but that night or the next day, your muscles may not be as pleased. Fitness related muscle soreness (also known as DOMS: delayed onset muscle soreness), is caused by micro-tears in the muscle tissue that occur during intensive exercise.

Does Protein Impact Trained Athletes Differently?

Evan Stevens Previously at Forever Fit Science we looked at how science changes and why we often need to re-evaluate our previously held beliefs and knowledge base. Timing, once thought to be integral to muscle protein synthesis (MPS) and needing to be taken within the 3 hour post exercise window, is now almost irrelevant

Which type of Protein Provides the Best Workout Recovery?

Evan Stevens In our previous article, The Ever Changing Science of Protein, discussed how science is ever changing and how new evidence or looking at entire bodies of evidence can change our perceptions of what we thought to be true. We discussed the importance of (or lack thereof) timing of ingestion and why as long

Why Milk is an Effective Recovery Drink for Female Athletes

Mojtaba Kaviani, Ph.D., CEP Cow milk contains protein, casein, carbohydrates, fat, vitamins and minerals, which are useful components of a recovery drink after exercise. Lactose, casein protein, and milk electrolytes are effective in glycogen synthesis, muscle protein synthesis, and replacement of body fluids post-workout. Previous studies have shown that the consumption of 500 ml of

The Truth Behind Static & Dynamic Stretching

A Review by Alyssa Bialowas Effective stretching techniques used by athletes offer vital benefits to their competitive performance, such as flexibility, increased range of motion, injury prevention, and the prevention of muscle soreness prior to or following exercise. Stretching techniques used by athletes, trainers, or coaches include ballistic, static and dynamic stretching. During ballistic stretching

Can Head Cooling Increase Aerobic Performance In The Heat?

A Review by Alyssa Bialowas Thermoregulation and managing heat stress is critical for aerobic and anaerobic athletes that complete in hot and dry conditions. Competing in such conditions can diminish physical performance, and athletes tolerate varying levels of temperature exposure. Various cooling methods have been employed to address rising body temperatures and thermal stress. 

DHA Supplementation Reduces Inflammation After Exercise

Alyssa Bialowas Introduction to DHA Supplementation Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid. It is essential for the growth and functional development of the infant brain. It is a primary structural component and required for the maintenance of the adult human brain, cerebral cortex, skin, and retina in adults. Humans obtain DHA directly from

Music – Your HIIT Recovery Secret Weapon

Catherine O'Brien The effects of music on exercise experience is a common theme throughout my articles. I am always interested in the relationship between music and physical activity and how music can alter an exercise session. To date, I have primarily written about the role of music during exercise - see The Science Behind Good

Citrus Flavonoid Supplementation May Improve Exercise Performance

Alyssa Bialowas The proper diet and supplementation regimen can improve exercise performance in athletes. Research supports the idea that nutritional supplementation is beneficial for exercise performance, and aids the process of recovery following exercise. As we know, high intensity exercise induces delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) due to muscle cell injury and subsequent inflammation,

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